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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the after-hours, if people are short-covering they're doing it obviously in a more difficult environment. david: who would have guessed it was in double digits less than a year ago it is trading over 200. it hasn't traded over 200 a share since september 14th, 2011. this is long way coming. liz: long way to go. david: have you been to the airport recently? you go to the airport all the time. you go home to the airport to get back to new jersey. airport delays as faa furloughs begin to kick in. liz: rich edson at the airport. what are you hearing overall about the situation, rich? overall we got hundreds of delays yesterday. airline association says we could see up to a few thousand delays because of this when you look at this, go around the country, there are delays in charlotte, there are delays elsewhere. faa is saying there are delays basically close to coast. as far as specifics are concerned they could not provide us with any ties of numbers. that has a number about folks, especially republicans in congress say this is entirely structured by the faa to inflict what they say is maxim
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
-- scare people, but what you should do in this environment is don't get distracted from there, don't go for fear. >> ross, if what you're saying suggests, perhaps, gold still is a safe haven, why do you think so? >> let me qualify that. it's an imperfect safe haven. it's an imperfect safe haven, particularly in the short run. >> against what? >> against financial meltdown or inflation or politicians not doing what they should do, in that case. so it's an insurance plan, if you like. >> is the reason we have this down move is because people are now -- is the gold pricing in the fact we're not going to get more qe out of -- >> it may be. and it's part of the story dwr the shorts have hit gold is not because of what has happened, but because of what hasn't happened. we haven't had hyper inflation. we didn't have the euro collapse. certain things didn't happen. i think that would have aggravated the gold market. fundamentally, it still remains in the short-term a long haven and imperfect. >> if nvs the kind of move, you know, that indicated that if gold were going to respond to more quantit
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
there are that can do no wrong. so what qualifies as a company that can do no wrong in this environment? a couple of things. first, a company makes something with declining raw costs that it charges more for than it used to, and people have to pay that higher price because they have no alternative. and that's pretty much everything that sells at a supermarket or drugstore these days. think about it. what's the raw cost of a drug? virtually nothing. and what can they charge? virtually anything, as we see pretty much nightly these days on "mad money" when we have these execs on that talk about the huge prices they're charging. do you think celgene can't raise the price of revlimid, its breakthrough cancer drug? are you worried regeneron can't raise the price of eylea, an injectable medicine that can make you see again and requires fewer shots in the eye than the competition? i'm not that concerned. how about the toiletries? let's take head & shoulders, the terrific shampoo, not the terrifying chart pattern. the plastic bottle costs less than it used to because of the low price of natural gas courte
that the environment worldwide is just too hard to deliver the dough. jimmy in california. jimmy! >> boo-yah, cramer, how are you? >> real good, partner. how are you? >> caller: real good, thanks. in light of the tragedies in texas, with the pullback in fertilizer stocks and the biggest corn crop since '36, what do you think about rnf with a 9% dividend or are you still sticking with seeya? >> we bought thought that was a really good idea. it's funny it hit your radar screen and my radar screen. i think that rentech is a good, good idea. it's just funny, because i was thinking about doing that on the show next week. let's go to chris in california, chris? >> caller: hey, jim, i love your show. i have a question regarding ebay. the earnings were yesterday. is this a overreaction and where do we go from here? >> i thought it was an overreaction, but there'll probably be a second day of overreaction, because people were so stunned that they actually talked about a bit of a slowdown in europe. i think the important takeaway is they reiterated and reaffirmed their growth, which is amazing. i want to buy
eliminate the other factors present in the environment. in fact, we wouldn't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing, the fbi initiated a command post. those assigned to the jttf intelligence analysts and other personnel from every state, local and federal government agency associated with jttf, and many others on their own's including boston pd and mass state police, more than a thousand law enforcement officers across many agencies have been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began to canvass sources and conduct interviews with others to determine who was responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically and carefully. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already, the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of noon today, many of which have already been reviewed, analyzed and vetted. we will continue to work around the clock tirelessly si
the internet, either at home or at the office or in the retail environment. so we're orienting everything we're doing at ebay, ebay, inc., to help consumers have a seamless shopping experience. >> john, last question i have, if there's one danger that i see particularly for paypal, it is scrappy competitors coming up, what you talked about last time you and i talked, braintree, et cetera, that have gotten some of the hot mobile retail start-ups under their wing. what's the major ting that ebay has to do to get the next fab, the next uber, for instance, under the paypal wing? >> well, there's going to be a lot of innovation in mobile payments and in this whole space because there's so much change. weened that. we actually respect and like that. we made several acquisitions. but we're innovating aggressively as well. we just launched our new mobile software library at south by southwest and actually companies like uber, companies like fab are using paypal and integrating paypal because paypal brings 120 million active consumers. paypal brings a network of capability that is strong. and so ther
this company which is also dunk can heinz is a really good situation. especially in this environment. why don't we go to bruno in florida. bruno. >> caller: jimmy! big boo-yah to ya! >> hey, sunshine, what's shaking? >> caller: not much, man. marine technology. unfortunately, i got it when the company went public on the ipo in 1920. posting 95. what do you think about this? >> i was surprised the stock didn't act better, given how many ipo positive initiations there were today. i think the stock is a buy. i like that kind of programmatic advertising business for the web. i think you trade this thing up to 16, 17. i think you've got some room to run. all right. lots of ipos on the horizon. you know i'm liking this black hawk. and sea world. remember, not the chase in the after market, but slow and steady safeway is a good alternative if you can't get into black hawk. and you know what, fairway, real good produce. don't go anywhere. "lightning round" is coming up next. i know what you're thinking... transit fares! as in the 37 billion transit fares we help collect each year. no? oh, right. you'
into his environment. "mad money"'s back to school tour returns april 25th. don't miss a second of "mad money." follow, @jimcramer on twitter. send jim an e-mail to mad money@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-74 had 3-cnbc. miss something? head to mad money.cnbc.com. >>> welcome back to a bizarrely "mad money." i have stumbled around the stock market long enough to learn a thing or two. tonight you're getting some of that wisdom from the school of hard knocks. don't you always love it at the beginning of a football game where they say, jim cramer, school of hard knocks? that's what i attended when it came to stocks. you're getting the online version right here, right now. the greatest game, stocks & bonds with its stock certificates and its game board and all the little cool doodads. what would send a stock higher? you keep track. i left the stock market games behind me by the time i got to middle school. my object sessions became sports. i was the second fastest guy in the school forever, so i ran track. and then, of course, girls whose movements were more lucid than even the ranges
is looking for right now. remember, the stocks that are consistently working this environment belong to companies that benefit from moderating commodity costs and can continue to raise or at least maintain prices on their customers. meanwhile, the company is doing very well. kimberly-clark just reported on friday and delivered a 3 cent earnings beat on $1.33 basis courtesy of solid organic sales, terrific growth and improving margins. plus the company also raises guidance for the full year and on top of that, kimberly-clark pays a healthy dividend which yields, and they have been a serial increase. can this stock keep outperforming like it's been doing despite the fact that many analysts don't think it can? let's talk to tom faulk chairman and ceo to hear more about the quarter and what comes next. mr. faulk, welcome to "mad money." >> boo-yah, jim. how is it going? >> going really well. thank you, tom. great to have you on the show. >> jim, let me tell you. your set has never looked better. you've got the finest products in the world there. and we hope you love the "mad money" kleen
this extraordinary security environment here in boston and the suburbs. understandable why in water where they believe that he may be holed up. that explains the situation around there. they think they know where he is, but not positive. there is a concern for the last couple of hours that he and his brother may have had accomplices and those accomplices may be at large and could be dangerous. this morning authorities found and disarmed another bomb in the boston area. i say another bomb. i mean a bomb today in the boston area. there is a concern about whether there could be other devices. you put all of those factorsing to and that's the explanation for the unprecedentedly strict security in boston and the suburbs right now. >> when you talk about the motivation and their state of mind and why they did what they did including the attempted robbery of that 7-11, you have got more information on the carjacking that occurred. they took a man at gunpoint for about a half hour. >> right. after the robbery of the 7-11 and after shooting the campus policemen. they carjack and got an suv and hel
a weaker or softish commodity environment will drive that even further and higher. >> when i see you, the one commodity which is oil, give me your take here and correct me if i'm wrong, but you've always been a big bull. >> yeah. reality is oil. we just don't have a lot of new sources for it and you really have to take the world and slam it to almost zero growth before that would really undermine the supply/demand picture for oil. oil production grows about a million, a million and a half barrels a year and demand grows about that amount and the cost structure to bring that on is now $80 to $90 a barrel and i can't say this doomsday scenario that people say the oil markets will be prone to, and if it fits in the broader picture that the global economy is doing fine, you will see oil bottoming here in the next $5, $6 a barrel and probably making close to a new high by the end of the year. so everybody understands why that's a positive, but there are some who want to read both the decline in crude and gold as, all right, we're not going to have inflation and we're also not going to hav
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
in this environment or in that square. we have to check the integrity of the buildings. because of that the city is unable to release a time frame when the square will be reopened to the public, when people will come back to their businesses. jenna? jenna: more when we get it, mike. mike tobin live in boston today. jon: charges in connection with the boston terror attacks and the aftermath could come as early as today as investigators continue to look for answers. they want to know if dzhokhar tsarnaev and his brother acted alone. but his serious injuries are slowing their progress. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington right now. so what are we learning about the fbi's contact with the suspect, catherine? >> reporter: a leading republican briefed by the assistant director of the fbi last night tells fox news the risch shun equivalent of the fbi sent a letter to the bureau that they suspected older brother was a islamist extremist and believe in their cause. tamerlan tsarnaev travel oversees in 6 months, in 2012, that was not on the fbi radar that he misspelle
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
women who left restrictive religious environments. lea said he felt ostracised not following her family's strict faith and that her family stopped supporting her when she was just 16 years old. lea, welcome. thank you so much for being here. [applause] >> thank you. katie: you know, i think we should say first of all, there are many variations to all faiths. christianity, is lamb, but you describe your faith as ultra orthodox. so, what did that mean growing up in your home, lea? >> so, even within ultraorthodox, there are many, many different sects. in my family that meant we believed, we under god's will in a way nobody else did. it was a very strict interpretation of biblical law. the sabbath was observed very strictly. cosher had a whole set of extra rules that other jews may not have been familiar with. there was a strict segregation of the sexes. girls and women were supposed to be very modest and really our whole lives were very much shaped and defined by this identity. katie: what kind of limitations were put on you as a girl growing up in your family? >> well, for me as a girl,
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
environment where anchors are filling, but you are right -- >> but they are really not that fast breaking. they are in the moment, but we don't have a lot of information. if you think about it if they had only reported what news they had, it would have had about three minutes of information, and then they could have said come back later, we'll tell you what else we got. but instead there was a bombing, we have surveillance video, the cops are doing xyandz and now we're going to talk about what people think could happen or what type of bombing should be. >> stephanie: yeah, is anybody saying the texas thing -- >> nobody is saying that yet. they are saying it was probably an accident. >> there's video now. i mean if you think about -- the reason the fertilizer plant thing is such a big deal if you think about how much fertilizer mcveigh used it was inside of a truck, and the damage it caused. you are talking about an entire plant of fertilizer and if you look at the one video i have seen of the explosion, it was ginormous. >> five blocks surrounding the plant have been c
. two reasons for this. one, urban environments are used to the advantage of the suspect. less options they have to runaround, better it is and also for public safety. also, during the initial car chase, the brothers showed an ability to bring in a hostage and that is at issue also. and we'll take a look at a live picture. what do we have going on? tell me again, control room? what do you want me to go to? okay, elizabeth cohen reports that the fbi is coming out of the suspect's home right now. pretexturaly we have to figure out what that means? elizabeth, can you hear me? what's going on right now? >> i sure can hear you. a dozen fbi agents with rifles just came out of 410 norfolk street, the address of the man they are looking for. they had assault rifles. they did not have anyone with them. they have widened this crime scene area, it was a lot smaller literally five minutes ago. pushed back all the media, pushed back all the residents and really about a half an hour or so ago, evacuating residents, som some coming out with their pajamas. a dozen fbi agents came out of 410 norfolk st
in an environment where we have large export content. so the world is our market, basical basically, more than europe. >> okay. we'll leave it there. jan erik back. thank you very much. >>> apple will report results today amid the company's free fall in stocks in recent weeks. analysts expect apple will post its year on year decline in a decade. revenue is expected to hit a record but with growth of only on 8% for sales which will be one of the weakest increases in several quarters. the company is hurt by soft demand for the iphone and lower profit margins on the ipad. apple closed about $398 on monday. the stock is down 42% since hitting a record high over $700 in september. so will the company's results leave a sour taste with investors? we'll preview the tech giant's earnings with the editor in about 15 minutes' time. >>> meanwhile, netflix's first quarter profits easily beat forecasts as they reported solid subscriber growth. the company added 2 million new customers for its $8 a month streaming service. the company expects subscriber growth slower in the second quarter, but shares jumped
them into an environment that is hostile to gays and lesbians -- >> stephanie: yeah. that's true. you are teaching them, like it's okay if this is a phase and then just work your way out of it by the time you were 18. >> yeah, and if you don't then we don't want you. but while you are here maybe let's do some back door repair with therapy. >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: we have people who are totally anti-gay with their arms wrapped around people who need to see the light and be morally straight. >> yeah. ann romney will show up saying stop it. >> ann romney: stop it. this is hard. you want to try it get in the ring. stop it. >> stephanie: are you pitching a tent. top it. merny you are on the "stephanie miller show." >> caller: good morning, stephanie. hang on just a minute -- i got to -- >> stephanie: okay. >> caller: i just wanted to remind everybody that pedophilia is not about the sex, it's a form of rape basically -- it's about domination power, control, the whole bit, and i think these people are just a little bit afraid to seay adults, heaven forbid h
of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in a post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse or cruel treatment when those techniques were applied by foreign governments. the cia recognized this in an internal review and acknowledged that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with the public policy positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticizes another nation for engaging in torture and then justifies the same conduct under national security arguments. there are those that defend the techniques like waterboarding, stress positions and sleep deprivation because there was the office of legal counsel which issued a decision approving of their use because they defined them as not being torture. those opinions have since been repudiated by legal experts and the olc itself. and even in its opinion it relied not only on a very narrow legal definition of torture, but also on factual representations about how the tec
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)